Character Types: The Parents

We all know that parent in YA novels. theparentspinterestYou know: the one who doesn’t know what’s going on and opposes the young protagonist for most of the book–but then finally admits that their child was right all along right before the book ends.

If you haven’t noticed already, it’s a rather problematic stereotype. Which is exactly why we’re tackling it in today’s video. We also call for questions for our first-ever Q&A at the end of the video! So if there are any questions you’ve been dying to ask, then now’s your chance!

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Josiah’s Article on Coming-of-Age Stories and How Parents Fit Into Them

Previous Stereotypes:

The Comic Relief

The Mentor

The Damsel in Distress

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf started reading when he was four, started writing fiction when he was six and hasn’t stopped doing either ever since. After growing up with seven younger siblings, he eventually found himself graduated and attending Patrick Henry College, where he plans on majoring in literature with a minor in pedagogy (it’s a fancy Greek word for education).
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels that have worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as fun as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. Plans for obtaining those impossible goals include listening to a lot of Hans Zimmer, ignoring college work so that he can find time to write, and avoiding coffee at all costs.

Character Types: The Comic Relief

You know that side-kick character that’s supposed to be funny but really isn’t? Yeah, we know about that character too. And we dedicated a whole video to talk about how to do a comic relief character well without falling into that annoying stereotype.

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Previous Stereotypes:

The Mentor

The Damsel in Distress

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf started reading when he was four, started writing fiction when he was six and hasn’t stopped doing either ever since. After growing up with seven younger siblings, he eventually found himself graduated and attending Patrick Henry College, where he plans on majoring in literature with a minor in pedagogy (it’s a fancy Greek word for education).
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels that have worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as fun as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. Plans for obtaining those impossible goals include listening to a lot of Hans Zimmer, ignoring college work so that he can find time to write, and avoiding coffee at all costs.

Interview with Steve Laube on Publishing Part Three

In this last part of our interview with publisher and literary agent Steve Laube, we discuss what advice he has to give to younger writers, what his essential writing resources are, and more! If you haven’t seen the first two parts of the interview yet, check out Part One and Part Two before watching the final clip!

Interview on Publishing with Steve Laube Part Two

In this second part of our interview with publisher and literary agent Steve Laube, we discuss what the publishing process looks like, what book deals and book negotiations look like, and what crazy stories he has to tell as a literary agent! If you haven’t already seen the first part of our interview, check it out here, then watch the next part below!

 

Interview on Publishing with Steve Laube Part One

Today we’ve got a special treat for you! Our very own Haley Long managed to run into Steve Laube at the One Year Adventure Novel conference earlier this year and get a video interview with him.

If you don’t know the name Steve Laube, you probably should. Laube has been a literary agent representing Christian books for several decades now, was named the AWSA Golden Scroll Editor of the Year in 2002, and also runs Enclave Publishing, which lists itself as “the premier publisher of Christian speculative fiction.” If you’re interested in getting traditionally published in the Christian market in the future, especially if you’re interested in getting published in Christian sci-fi or fantasy, Laube is a must-know in the industry. I (Josiah) have been following his blog (stevelaube.com) for close to eight years now and have found it to be tremendously helpful in understanding the publishing industry.

Because we had to do this on the spot at the conference, the video footage isn’t fantastic, but the content is superb. So check out our video interview with him below and let us know in the comments what you think! We’ll be releasing Part Two of the footage on September 22nd and Part Three on September 27th.

 

Is the Damsel-in-Distress a Sexist Stereotype?

So, as I explained at the end of our September video on the Damsel-in-Distress character, while we were shooting our September video, the three of us (Daniel, Anna, and myself) kind of got into a bit of a debate about the damsel-in-distress character type and whether or not it’s a sexist character type. The camera happened to be running through our discussion, and so we thought you might enjoy the footage of our unscripted discussion. Watch the video, and then let us know in the comments where you fall on this issue!

 

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf started reading when he was four, started writing fiction when he was six and hasn’t stopped doing either ever since. After growing up with seven younger siblings, he eventually found himself graduated and attending Patrick Henry College, where he plans on majoring in literature with a minor in pedagogy (it’s a fancy Greek word for education).
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels that have worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as fun as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. Plans for obtaining those impossible goals include listening to a lot of Hans Zimmer, ignoring college work so that he can find time to write, and avoiding coffee at all costs.

Character Types: The Damsel in Distress

Daniel’s decided he has better things to do in life, so Anna moves out from behind the camera to discuss the damsel in distress character type with Josiah. Is the damsel in distress a worn stereotype that should just be thrown out, or is it possible for even a damsel in distress to be a compelling character? We tackle this question and more in this video!

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Previous Stereotypes:

The Mentor

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf started reading when he was four, started writing fiction when he was six and hasn’t stopped doing either ever since. After growing up with seven younger siblings, he eventually found himself graduated and attending Patrick Henry College, where he plans on majoring in literature with a minor in pedagogy (it’s a fancy Greek word for education).
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels that have worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as fun as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. Plans for obtaining those impossible goals include listening to a lot of Hans Zimmer, ignoring college work so that he can find time to write, and avoiding coffee at all costs.

Character Types: The Mentor

So, this video was originally going to come out last month.  But then my laptop decided to turn into a brick the evening I was planning on uploading it to Youtube.  After the hassle of buying a new laptop and recovering all my old files, though, we finally have the video to share with you all.  So tune in as, in this video, Daniel complains about how the mentor is used in fiction and Josiah tries to explain to him why the mentor figure doesn’t always have to be a poorly-written character in fiction.

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Introduction to the Series

Music Credit: audiomachine.com

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf started reading when he was four, started writing fiction when he was six and hasn’t stopped doing either ever since. After growing up with seven younger siblings, he eventually found himself graduated and attending Patrick Henry College, where he plans on majoring in literature with a minor in pedagogy (it’s a fancy Greek word for education).
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels that have worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as fun as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. Plans for obtaining those impossible goals include listening to a lot of Hans Zimmer, ignoring college work so that he can find time to write, and avoiding coffee at all costs.

Introduction to Character Archetypes & Stereotypes

We kick-off our newest series… At least Daniel attempts to kick it off. Josiah may need some convincing that now is really the best time to talk about our upcoming series of videos.

Interested in reading more about this topic? Check out Josiah’s article here!

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Music Credit: AudioMachine

Character Stereotypes:

The Mentor

The Henchman

The Herald

The Love Interest

The Evil Overlord

The Strong Female Character (TM)

The Damsel in Distress

The Parents

The Comic Relief

 

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf started reading when he was four, started writing fiction when he was six and hasn’t stopped doing either ever since. After growing up with seven younger siblings, he eventually found himself graduated and attending Patrick Henry College, where he plans on majoring in literature with a minor in pedagogy (it’s a fancy Greek word for education).
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels that have worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as fun as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. Plans for obtaining those impossible goals include listening to a lot of Hans Zimmer, ignoring college work so that he can find time to write, and avoiding coffee at all costs.

Journeying Through Your Novel Part Nine: The Resolution

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The last video of our Journeying Through Your Novel series, in which we talk about what happens after the climax of a novel, discuss the future plans for our show, and do a second post-credits interview.  Check it out and let us know what you thought of the series as a whole in the comments!

 

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Part One: The Characteristic Moment

Part Two: The Inciting Event

Part Three: The Pushpoint

Part Four: Tests and Trials (Part I)

Part Five: The Midpoint Shakeup

Part Six: Tests and Trials (Part II)

Part Seven: The Lowpoint

Part Eight: The Climax

Music Credit: audiomachine.com

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf started reading when he was four, started writing fiction when he was six and hasn’t stopped doing either ever since. After growing up with seven younger siblings, he eventually found himself graduated and attending Patrick Henry College, where he plans on majoring in literature with a minor in pedagogy (it’s a fancy Greek word for education).
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels that have worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as fun as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. Plans for obtaining those impossible goals include listening to a lot of Hans Zimmer, ignoring college work so that he can find time to write, and avoiding coffee at all costs.