Loved

By Ingrid Dornbirer

Shattered and shameful,

These things described me.

Fearful and hateful.

These words defined me.

lovedpinterest

Broken and chained.

That’s how He found me.

Confused and blamed,

When His love surrounded me. [Read more…]

KP Book Review: Inkheart

by Cornelia Funke

Every avid reader has dreamed of being able to meet his favorite characters in the books that he’s read.  Mortimer Folchart (Mo) has always dreamed of being able to do the same.  One day, while reading aloud from one of his favorite books, he discovers that he is able to read characters out of the books and into the real world by doing so.  It would have been a magnificent discovery if it weren’t for two problems.  The first is that he makes the mistake of reading the villains out of the book along with the hero.  And the second is that when characters are read out of the book, someone else needs to go in, and so by reading these characters out of the story world, his wife is sucked into it. inkheartreview

Ten years later, the villains of the book he read are still running around the world creating chaos and his twelve-year old daughter Maggie is beginning to demand answers.  [Read more…]

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf is a high school English teacher and literature nerd who fell in love with stories when he was young and hasn’t fallen out of love ever since.
He writes because he’s fascinated by human motivations. What causes otherwise-good people to make really terrible decisions in their lives? Why do some people have the strength to withstand temptation when others don’t? How do people respond to periods of intense suffering? What does it mean to be a hero?
These questions drive him as a reader, and they drive him as a writer as well as he takes normal people, puts them in crazy situations (did he mention he writes fantasy?), and then forces them to make difficult choices with their lives.
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels with worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as entertaining as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. In the meantime, you can find him writing articles here or short stories at his website (link below) as he works toward achieving these goals.

Poetry Contest – Announcing the 1st Place Winner!

Here it is! The announcement you’ve all been waiting for…

This poem…just wow. It touched MacKenzie and I both on a deeper level. Which is why we picked it. As I was reading it a sense of wonderment and a worshipful spirit awakened and I felt drawn to my knees. Not only that, but the specific words used and double meanings laced throughout caused us to ponder as we read.

When you can provoke that kind of reaction in a poem, you know you have written a great one! I am most certain that you will have a similar reaction as you read this poem.   poetrycontestwinnerpost

Ladies and gentlemen, I proudly pronounce that Aberdeen Livingstone’s poem, Weight of Glory won first place! 

Weight of Glory

 

cool wind like an old friend, new adventure, purls over me, sifts through my hair

stars spear light aeons old, falling like a kiss, newborn to me

leaves like paint chips dance downward to find a new belonging place

(because this is not the end)

trees, bereft, bare, but blooming with hidden life for yet another spring

(because there is always a new beginning

my little corner of the universe illuminated with so much glory—

shoes off, knees down, bow in awe

(because this burning bush is blinding)

somewhere the sea roars its celestial praises, uncontainable joy in the fury

somewhere the mountains murmur in the twilight of a King far loftier

somewhere the desert stretches, speechless, smeared with glory

but here too—even here—the majesty makes mute

(because sometimes words are not enough

glory like a shroud over all the land, woven into its very fabric, seething with lava at its core

(because Immanuel is God with us

sparkling with every grain of dirt, singing with every cricket chirp

(with us)

and I am unmade, remade by this weight of glory

 

IMG_1950According to her brothers, the sound that characterizes Aberdeen Livingstone is clicking computer keys as she creates poems, novels, and short stories. A logophile and quote collector, Aberdeen loves reading an eclectic array of genres. She also enjoys traveling the world as a military kid, hanging out with her four younger siblings, listening to a variety of music from Handel to Hamilton, and pondering everything. A home-schooled junior, Aberdeen is full of dreams for her future, including plans to study graphic design or technical writing in college and schemes for world domination. Above all, Aberdeen is a redeemed daughter of the King. You can read more of her writing at A Glimpse of Starlight.

 

Poetry Contest – Announcing the 2nd Place Winner!

Who’s ready to find out who the second place winner is???
Sorry for delaying this and dragging out the suspense; I’ll drag it out no longer!!!  poetrycontest2ndplacepinterest

MacKenzie and I were absolutely delighted with this poem. (I know, I know, I said I wouldn’t drag it out any longer, but this is fun! Keep reading!) The poem itself actually looks like a piece of art. The shape of it reminds you of a falling raindrop. As the poem progresses you can almost feel the rain falling. The creativity and style was fabulous! I’m sure you’ll enjoy reading it just as much as we did!

Congratulations Katrina V. on your poem, Rain

[Read more…]

Poetry Contest – Announcing 3rd Place!

We are so excited to finally be revealing to all of you the third place winner! MacKenzie and I had a difficult time narrowing it down as there were thirty entries, but we made the choice and here is the poem that snatched our creative writer’s side.poetrycontest3rdplacepinterest

This poem is perfect for writers as we can all relate to the big bad, evil writer’s block! 

We hope you enjoy reading it just as much as we did!

Congratulations Lauryn Trimmer!! 

The Death of Imagination

A Poem Illustrating Writer’s Block

It was a terrible fate,

My imagination was left out at the gate

And, in the mad criticism of late,

Was swiftly murdered by the hate.

This is still a terrified shore

As we roam the streets he’d roam the more,

All of us shall miss him sore,

And forgetting him will be a chore.

This was wickedly preordained

By the critics whose displeasure rained.

His blood they spilled, his tunic they stained.

Poor Imagination will never be regained.

This is a horrid time,

The melancholy church bells chime

For the master of all sorts of mime,

Of writing, acting, and of rhyme.

This is indeed a ghastly scene,

His grave is blanketed in green,

His tombstone the bleakest I have ever seen,

The sadness of its words is keen.

This is a depressing view,

A group of my characters, although few,

Cried rivers of tears as if on cue

For the imagination we all once knew.

Lauryn_TrimmerLauryn Trimmer lives in California with her parents and two brothers. When Lauryn was three, she began writing her own stories, most of them starring Snow White and Larry the cucumber. Now she enjoys writing poetry and working on her two novels. Her favorite genre is fantasy, but she writes contemporary Christian stories too. When she isn’t writing, Lauryn enjoys singing, playing basketball, and archery. In the future, Lauryn hopes to become a published novelist and an actress.

How to Do a Character Archetype Well in Four Easy Steps

Character archetypes.  Most of us know common examples of them, even if you aren’t initially familiar with the term: the untested but eager youth, the aging mentor, the shifting ally, or the comic relief.  Character archetypes are essentially universal types of characters who appear over and over again in literature.  In the hands of a skilled writer, they can be used masterfully.  Yet, too often, in the hands of inexperienced writers, healthy archetypal characters turn into one-dimensional stereotypes, which can make it hard to distinguish an archetype from a stereotype.

In our latest video for Kingdom Cinema, we discussed many of the differences between an archetype and a characterarchetypepintereststereotype .  If you haven’t seen it yet, I’d encourage you to watch it HERE, but if you don’t have time, or if you just want a refresher, archetypes and stereotypes are similar in that they both appear over and over again in fiction, but whereas an archetype is just a general form for a character, a stereotype is a specific kind of character that doesn’t have much depth or personality to them.  Another way of looking at it is that an archetype is a general description of a character that can be developed, and a stereotype is a character who never moves past that description to form any personality or depth of their own.

This of course leads to a question: given how grey the line can sometimes be between a character who’s an archetype and a character who’s become a stereotype, how as a writer do you write an archetype well, in a way that doesn’t become stereotypical?  It may seem difficult at first.  But follow these four simple steps, and you’ll be well on your way to writing interesting archetypal characters.

1. Know the Archetype Well In Its Basic Form

[Read more…]

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf is a high school English teacher and literature nerd who fell in love with stories when he was young and hasn’t fallen out of love ever since.
He writes because he’s fascinated by human motivations. What causes otherwise-good people to make really terrible decisions in their lives? Why do some people have the strength to withstand temptation when others don’t? How do people respond to periods of intense suffering? What does it mean to be a hero?
These questions drive him as a reader, and they drive him as a writer as well as he takes normal people, puts them in crazy situations (did he mention he writes fantasy?), and then forces them to make difficult choices with their lives.
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels with worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as entertaining as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. In the meantime, you can find him writing articles here or short stories at his website (link below) as he works toward achieving these goals.

Introduction to Character Archetypes & Stereotypes

We kick-off our newest series… At least Daniel attempts to kick it off. Josiah may need some convincing that now is really the best time to talk about our upcoming series of videos.

Interested in reading more about this topic? Check out Josiah’s article here!

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Music Credit: AudioMachine

Character Stereotypes:

The Mentor

The Henchman

The Herald

The Love Interest

The Evil Overlord

The Strong Female Character (TM)

The Damsel in Distress

The Parents

The Comic Relief

 

Profile photo of Josiah DeGraaf
Josiah DeGraaf is a high school English teacher and literature nerd who fell in love with stories when he was young and hasn’t fallen out of love ever since.
He writes because he’s fascinated by human motivations. What causes otherwise-good people to make really terrible decisions in their lives? Why do some people have the strength to withstand temptation when others don’t? How do people respond to periods of intense suffering? What does it mean to be a hero?
These questions drive him as a reader, and they drive him as a writer as well as he takes normal people, puts them in crazy situations (did he mention he writes fantasy?), and then forces them to make difficult choices with their lives.
Someday, Josiah hopes to write fantasy novels with worlds as imaginative as Brandon Sanderson’s, characters as complex as Orson Scott Card’s, character arcs as dynamic as Jane Austen’s, themes as deep as Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s, and stories as entertaining as Wayne Thomas Batson’s. In the meantime, you can find him writing articles here or short stories at his website (link below) as he works toward achieving these goals.